Fish Cooking Times, Terminology and Substitutions - Just Fish/Seafood Recipes


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Fish Cooking Times, Terminology and Substitutions

American Measurements


FIRM-FLESHED FISH:
Shark, Swordfish, Orange Roughy, Fresh Albacore Tuna, Sea Bass, Halibut or Mahi Mahi.


WHITE FISH FILLETS:
Sole, Cod, Perch or Red Snapper.


MILD-FLAVORED WHITE FISH:
Halibut, Rockfish or Cod.


FLAT FISH:
Catfish, Cod, Flounder, Turbot or Haddock.


OILY FISH:
Salmon, Mackerel, Pollock, Sablefish (black cod), Turbot, Sturgeon, or Tuna


FOR CATFISH USE:
Cod, Perch, Pollock, Rockfish, Tilefish or Grouper.


FOR COD USE:
Rockfish, Sole, Flounder, Haddock, Lingcod, Halibut or Sablefish.


FOR CORBINA USE:
Sea Bass, Striped Bass, Redfish, Sea Trout, Snapper or Grouper.


FOR FLOUNDER USE:
Petrale or other Soles.


FOR GROUPER USE:
Sea Bass or Halibut.


FOR HALIBUT USE:
Grouper, Snapper, Bass, Sole or Fancy Rockfish.


FOR MACKEREL USE:
Tuna, Jack, Bluefish, Butterfish or Herring.


FOR MAHI-MAHI USE:
Swordfish, Halibut, Fresh Tuna or Shark.


FOR ORANGE ROUGHY USE:
Sole, Flounder, Haddock, Halibut or Ocean Perch.


FOR PERCH USE:
Sole, Cod, Bass or Red Snapper.


FOR REDFISH USE:
Striped Bass, White Sea Bass, Corbina, Sea Trout or Perch.


FOR RED SNAPPER USE:
Black Sea Bass, Striped Bass or Rockfish.


FOR SABLEFISH USE:
Black Cod or Lingcod.


FOR SALMON USE:
Steelhead, Red Sockeye, Pink or Chum Salmon, or Sturgeon.


FOR SEA BASS USE:
Striped Bass, Snapper, Redfish or Blackfish.


FOR SHARK USE:
Halibut, Swordfish, Bluefish, Mackerel, Shad or Tuna.


FOR SOLE USE:
Cod, Perch or Red Snapper.


FOR STURGEON USE:
Salmon or Halibut.


FOR TILEFISH USE:
Rockfish, Bass, Cod, Haddock or Sablefish.


FOR FRESH TUNA USE:
Swordfish, Shark, Mahi-Mahi.


FOR TURBOT USE:
Sole or Halibut.


Cook all fish to an internal temperature of 140 degrees F, until it flakes and loses its translucent (raw) appearance. A rule of thumb - whether you bake, fry, broil or grill fish -- is to cook it 10 minutes per inch of thickness. For frozen fish, increase the cooking time to 20 minutes per inch. Add 5 minutes to the calculated cooking time for each inch of thickness if you're cooking either fresh or frozen fish in a sauce. Extra time may also be needed if your fish is stuffed or cooked with vegetables. If you bake the fish, use an oven temperature of 425 to 450 degrees F. You know its done when the watery, translucent appearance of the flesh assumes an opaque cast. Do not overcook or it will be dry.


Source: Sharon Maasdam, FoodDay home economist
Typos by Dorothy Flatman 1996


Posted to MM-Recipes Digest V4 #12 by maintech@ne.infi.net on Jun 08, 99